The MAY that PAYS!

The MAY that PAYS!

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Dust Bothering Residents Living Near Landfill

CEDAR RAPIDS, IA (CBS 2/FOX 28)--We begin in Cedar Rapids where residents are demanding the city do more to help keep their neighborhood clean.

They live close to the so-called "Mount Trashmore" and say they're being overwhelmed by clouds of dust.

The city is putting a dirt "cap" on top of Mount Trashmore, a now closed landfill.

It's got trucks carrying gravel and dirt to the site all day long.

Problem is that leaves lots and lots of dust behind in nearby neighborhoods.

For Shane Dyson mowing the lawn is like mowing through one big pile of dust.

"It's been real thick. We can wash a car and half hour later it's covered again, he said.

Thats because he lives really close to Mount Trashmore.

The site has been closed twice since 2006 and is now closed for good.

Since late April the city has been working to cover the giant pile of trash with an earthen cap.

"Right now we're putting on the top vegetative layer so a lot of the top soil, and this is something we're mandated to do by the state Iowa Department of Natural Resources, said Joe Horaney, with Solid Waste Agency.

Its a $1.4 million project that's made life miserable for nearby residents.

"The summer is almost gone and my daughter has missed out on the whole summer, and shes not being able to play outside a lot because of the dust Dyson said.

The city says it's doing what it can to keep the dust down.

"We constantly have a water truck that's going back and forth trying to keep that truck on site so it doesn't go off onto the paved roads, Horaney.

Still with the dry weather the dust is on the roads and the sidewalks and the lawns.

"Hope they can hear us and clean up the area, Dyson said.

Theres no immediate relief for people living nearby. The project won't be done until mid-October, but the city says once the work is finished it will power wash the houses of those who want it.
 
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